Similarities between scientific management school and the human relation theory

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Explanation of scientific management 3. Explanation of human relations theory 4. Comparison of the two schools of management 4. Differences between scientific management and human relations theory 4.

Similarities of scientific management and human relations theory 5. List of references 1.

Similarities between scientific management school and the human relation theory

Introduction Maximizing efficiency, reducing costs and increasing profits are facts which will be always of high interest for companies. In the course of development of organizations different approaches have emerge to fulfill these interest.

The purpose of this essay is to compare scientific management and human relations theory. The paper will start by explaining both schools of management.

Differences and similarities will be discussed on the followings. With the help of these facts it can be shown how different these theories are and whether they achieve the same ends.

Explanation of scientific management Frederick Winslow Taylor was the founder of the scientific management SM also referred to as Taylorism Thompson and McHugh,p.

Optimize operational procedures and to implement the human recourse to be as effective as possible was the aim Taylor wanted to achieve.

Similarities between scientific management school and the human relation theory

Therefore, it was necessary to change the existing proportion between management and workers regarding, who is responsible for the way the work has to be done Thompson and McHugh,p. In the past the workers received their knowledge about working procedures from the previous generations or worked it out by themselves.

However, there was no assurance if the way of doing the job was the most effective one Thompson,p. To fix these problems and to make enterprises more profitable Taylor looked at the scientific side of establishments and developed four management principles.

Within this principle Taylor summarizes the whole accumulated knowledge of the workers and the company. Hence, he creates rules and norms for each process. Furthermore, he divided the processes in small parts and analyzed them concerning their lead time and course of movement.

As a result Taylor could identify and eliminate interference factors Taylor,p. After these processes the second principle follows referring to the workers.

Before Taylor developed this principle there was no selection or training of the workforce.

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Employees worked on their own and improved their skills and routines as good as possible. Now, a scientific based selection took place. Furthermore, the staff was exactly informed what they had to do and in which kind of way they had to do it Taylor,p. Nevertheless, one problem was left and this was about motivation.

Taylor named a number of different reasons, why the men worked very slowly and not as quickly as possible. However, the opposite is the case. Working faster means that the same number of people produce more goods.

As a result unit costs decrease and the company can sell the merchandises to lower prices. Accordingly demand and also the profit rises and thereby the enterprise can pay higher wages to their employees.

Resulting from this, Taylor implemented an incentive payment system to reward these workers who work more than others. Thus, he motivated the men in an economical way and reduced the might of the work-teams Littler,p.

This principle has two aims. On the one hand Taylor wants to achieve that the whole workforce follows the defined processes.

Compare and contrast the classical and human relations theories of management. | eNotes

On the other hand management and workers should work together. It is essential that both parties realize that it is more profitable for the company and their selves when they work hand in hand.

Furthermore this is a key determinant to translate scientific management from theory into practice Taylor,p. The relationship between men and management suffered another change referring work sharing. This is the topic of the final principle. In the past the workers themselves were responsible for every part of their job without support of the management.

Taylor has changed this proportion. Collecting the whole knowledge of the workers, creating rules and regulations and form a science for each process was no duty for the men Taylor,p.the main fe atures of Ta ylor’s ‘scientific management theory’ and Mayo’s ‘Human Relations theory’.

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The last part of the essay is to discuss major differences and similarities of this two. Dear Twitpic Community - thank you for all the wonderful photos you have taken over the years. We have now placed Twitpic in an archived state.

The human relations movement came as a criticism to the scientific school. The theory believes that there are other factors that actually motivate workers in an organisation other than the economical and environmental condition of workplace.

“despite the economic process brought about in part by scientific management, critics were calling attention to the seamy `side of progress, which include severe . Scientific Management and Human Relations School of Management Words | 9 Pages Scientific management theory and the human relations school theory are both theories developed in the 20th century as a means of increasing proficiency and effectiveness as .

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Similarities Between Scientific Management School And The Human Relation Theory Scientific management theory and the human relations school theory are both theories developed in the 20th century as a means of increasing proficiency and effectiveness as .

Compare and contrast the classical and human relations theories of management. | eNotes